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Page “Emilie attends another lecture by Frederick Douglass.”

April 25-27, 1863

Saturday, April 25, 1863.

[Fred] Duglass lectured last night at national hall stoped at nells to night and […] we went around to marys barker Promised me his Photograph

Sunday 26

very fine day very windy I went to church in the afternoon mr gibbs gave us a very good sermon Bible class at mrs hills very well attended

Monday 27

very grey did not get the we did not go down to school the boyes went down they did not like it he cursed we will not com down

 


Annotation 1

Frederick Douglass lectured on “The Affairs of the Nation” at National Hall on April 24. Sponsored by the Institute for Colored Youth, Douglass’ lecture occasioned two advertisements in the Recorder, one which read “[t]his is a worthy cause, and every colored lady and gentleman should lay by twenty-five cents, get a ticket, and go to the lecture.” “The Alumni Association,” The Christian Recorder, April 11, 1863; “National Hall-National Hall. Frederick Douglass,” The Christian Recorder, April 11, 1863.

Annotation 2

In the 1860s, photography became more accessible with the invention of carte-de-visite, small photographs (about 3 ¼ inches by 2 ¼ inches) that could be produced inexpensively. Americans, both black and white, visited a photographer for the first time and exchanged photographs. Painter, Sojourner Truth, 185-186.
In an 1863 speech, Frederick Douglass remarked that “the servant girl can now see a likeness of herself, such as noble ladies and even royalty itself could not purchase fifty years ago. Formerly, the luxury of a likeness was the exclusive privilege of the rich and great. But now, like education and a thousand other blessings brought to us by the advancing march of civilization, such pictures, are placed within easy reach of the humblest members of society.” Frederick Douglass, “Pictures and Progress,” 1863, Howard University Archives, http://www.huarchivesnet.howard.edu/0002huarnet/freddoug.htm.

 

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